2017 was a good year for The Buzz on HR, both online and off. The best part was finding my voice again as a writer and speaker. And feeling supported and encouraged by my readers to express myself fully and freely.

As someone who writes about management, leadership and human resources as my primary focus, it is hard to know sometimes how accepting people when you start pushing the boundaries and speaking up or out about controversial topics. There’s a fear that your audience won’t make the shift with you — and that you won’t find another one.  That fear kept me inconsistent with my writing for a few years.

In one of my earliest posts of the year, I declared 2017 The Year of the Savage. I committed myself to being bold and being honest. I’m proud of that.

2017 taught me that my audience will grow with me and that a new audience will find me when I am brave enough to be fully myself. Because truth always resonates and real always recognizes real.

So I’m excited as this new year begins — and I declare 2018 will be Savage AF as I push myself to be even more bold and honest and to stretch in new directions.

Before I get started, I want to take a quick look back at The Best of The Buzz on HR in 2017.

#5 – Addressing Gender Bias Complaints

Before the #MeToo movement reignited and took the nation by storm, this post gave practical advice on how address complaints in the workplace

#4 – Prioritizing Your Priorities

When your busy and everything needs to get done, use these methods to decide what to do first.

 

#3 – Your Employees Are In Pain

Following the events in Charlottesville, this post provided advice on how employers can acknowledge and heal the hurts caused by racial tensions and explosions.

 

#2 – Dear Pepsi, Your Apology Sucks

Following backlash from their new Kendall Jenner ad, Pepsi issued a weak apology. This post breaks down why it was so horrible — and how organizations can do better.

#1 – The #BlackBlogsMatter Challenge

February 2017 contained 28 posts addressing some of the most controversial topics in racism, diversity and inclusion. I couldn’t choose just one because they were all important, meaningful and widely read.